Michael Stevens Bobble Head and Zombobble

After making the VSauce-in-the-Box, I had some left-over castings of Michael’s noggin, which were perfect for a bobblehead. I used the best remaining castings to make the bobblehead, but there were also a lot of imperfect castings, including large holes where no resin got to that part of the mold. This looked pretty cool, and I realized I could make a zombie version of the bobblehead too– a zombobble, if you will.  The process was pretty much the same for both, so I assembled them at the same time. Keep reading for more gory details!

 

    

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The Stand

The body (and Corpse)

The Heads


 The Stand

You can’t bobble lying down, so the first thing I had to make was a platform on which Michael could stand. I wanted it to look like the slime that gets squeeszed out of the game cartridge at the end of classic VSauce eppisodes. 

I evened out a lump of Monster Claywith a trowel and applied heat to get a nice smooth surface. I traced a printed cutout of the logo, then carved that out of the clay.      

It was molded in silicone and cast in resin, then painted green with an airbrush. Getting the black model paint into all the crevices required fine brushes and very thin paint. 

     

The feet would need anchors, so I drilled tiny holes and countersinks to hold tiny brads flush, pointy ends up. 

 The Body (and Corpse)

The body required a fresh sculpt. I included a peg at the end of an extended neck, thinking I could slip a spring from a cheap pen onto it and glue the spring to the inside of the head. 

The whole thing was molded in a very Han Solo style, in a two part silicone mold, with guides to hold it in position. The seam needed a lot of cleanup, but I was pretty happy with the detail. 

Being a pretty stylish guy, I figured Michael’s shirt should have some kind of pattern on it, so I went with polka dots. It was hand-cramping but rewarding work. One of the body castings had air bubbles that were perfect for bite marks and lesions on the undead version, so I just worked with them. Obviously, there were two very drastically different hues for the skin. As it turned out, the spring from a pen was too stiff, so I found some more wiggly ones and drilled a hole into the neck for an anchor instead.     

      

 The Heads 

As mentioned above, the hollow casts from the head molds had mixed results, ranging from Holy Michael to Geriatric Michael. I went with the cleanest cast for the normal bobble and the gnarly one became the zombobble. 

Without paint he almost looks like Steve Jobs.

The normal face was a very straight-forward process of cleaning up and painting. The zomboble though, was much more challenging. I wanted to fill the holes with bones, musculature and other gore. At first I tried using the jaw of the shriveled, old-looking casting to put just below the surface of the zomboble face. 

It just wasn’t interesting enough, so I sculpted a some pieces from modeling clay to fit into the voids. 

    

I used modeling clay because I was running low on two-part silicone and had an idea for quick casting. I microwaved the Monster Clay until it was liquid and made tiny molds from it. The modeling clay got a bit stuck in the fine cracks of the teeth and face. Also, the heat generated from the two-part resin almost melted the Monster Clay as it set. I barely got it in the fridge in time to set with details intact. Not the best method, but in a pinch, it works.

They ended up looking great, even before paint. 

    

The base coats went on with an airbrush. Skin tones are hard to get right, and zombified skin is no exception. 

I made tiny glasses, just like for the VSauce-in-the-Box, making sure the zombobble’s were broken and slightly askew. By far the most fun part was painting all the blood and grime onto the zombie face. 

           

The spring for the magical bobble action stuck surprisingly well with a blob of hot glue. 

 

  

It’s ALIVE!!!!!

Both of them look great on a desk next to my Torchy‚Äôs Tacos Dancing Devil.

Thanks for reading! 

 

 

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